An Interview with Niall Moorjani

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Can you remember when you were a kid & you got a story at bedtime… well Niall Moorjani certainly does, & he’s created a brilliant selection of tales for the Fringe.


Hello Niall, so where ya from & where ya at, geographically speaking?
Niall: I am from Dundee originally and currently live in Edinburgh where I have lived on and off for the last six years.

When did you first realise you could tell a good story?
Niall: I’ve always loved to write and obviously that is a form of storytelling, but the first time I realised was when I got a job doing Ghost Tours around Edinburgh. I was doing the training and my trainer just looked at me and said “you have got it, you will need work, but you have got it.” I am very rarely good at things so this was just a lovely thing to hear and I have been telling tales ever since.

You are stranded on a desert island with three good books. What would they be?
Niall: Thomas the Rhymer by Ellen Kushner, The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins and The Lord of the Rings Trilogy by J.R.R Tolkien.

What does Niall Moorjani like to do when he’s not being creative?
Niall: My main source of income is tour guiding, which has taken me all over the world. But at the moment I am very much sticking to tours around Scotland and Edinburgh. I am also pretty sporty, in no way does that mean I am good at sport, but I love playing tennis, cricket, rugby, football, etc, ect. Essentially my criteria for a good sport is the same as a Labrador’s; if there is a ball and I can chase it, it is a good sport.

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You are bringing Bedtime Stories to this year’s Fringe, can you tell us about the show?
Niall: It is a live performance storytelling show, so no paper or books, everything is learned off by heart. The reason it is called Bedtime Stories is because it is told through the medium of a father telling his son just those. Essentially the kid asks for a story and all the stories you hear throughout the show are for him. They contain everything you want from good traditional tales: giants, witches, heroes, heroines, lovers, sorrow joy and much more. The stories are also accompanied by live music which adds a sense of serenity and magic. What we are trying to do is get people back into listening to stories like they did when they were children,so as adults we just seem to think it is childish. However, there is no reason why adults can’t enjoy tales told in the same way. So hopefully the show will help fit into and continue the very old and rich tradition that is storytelling.

That rather sounds like a modern version of The Canterbury Tales, 1001 Nights & The Decameron, were you inspired by the format?
Niall: The idea of stories within stories is one I have always loved. As you say it is obviously very old and a classic storytelling device, a way of sending a thread to tie together all the little stories you have and make them into one. So most certainly yes, yes I was and I only hope we are doing the device justice.

How did you select your tales, & which one has the most obscure origins?
Niall: So I write them myself, generally when people don’t throw things at me while I tell them I assume they are good enough and make it into the show. But they are all original tales which I think is important. At the moment there seems to be a divide between traditionalists and modernists when it comes to fairy tales. Traditionalists don’t want to see the stories updated as they feel that causes them to loose authenticity (which is nonsense as stories are always evolving). And modernists often want to subvert and break down the concepts that make fairy tales tick, but for me in doing so they often lose that magic that was so captivating when we were children. So with my stories I am hoping to do both, update old ideas and make them accessible for a modern audience; whilst maintaining the traditional feeling and magic of old fairy tales. So they feel like old stories, when I don’t tell people I wrote them they just assume they are classic stories, but dig a little deeper and they are clearly not. Very few old stories contain gender neutral dragons, male witches, queer love stories, or even female heroes. I don’t know if I have done a good job of this, but my dream is to be able to read stories to my kids (if/when I have them it is a while off), and my kids could be any kind of person, so I have to write stories for all they could be.

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Your storytelling will be accompanied by two musicians; who are they, what do they play & how did they get involved?
Niall: So myself and the lovely Anna-Marta were sat chatting in a pub with some pals and I was telling her about the show, and I just asked if she fancied being involved. She said she wasn’t very good (which was a filthy lie) and it started with her playing guitar in the background while I told stories. I then learned that one of my colleges at work played the harp and asked her if she fancied being involved too. She did and Ruth is amazing (despite denying it hugely). So now they have become integral to the whole show, with their music they add an extra layer of emotion and rhythm which make the stories so much better. It is like having two audio-illustrators and Anna-Marta has even written the show a song. They easily worth seeing in their own right, so to have them on board and so heavily involved is such a treat.

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Can you tell us about your venue, Edinburgh’s Radical Bookshop?
Niall: Lighthouse is amazing! Firstly it is just the nicest bookshop in all the land, you shouldn’t judge a book by it’s cover, but there are so many pretty covers. Going in and not coming out with something is a serious issue. However, I think more important is the community the bookshop represents. It stocks a huge amount of feminist, queer and politically radical literature which is otherwise very hard to find. It also hosts events surrounding these issues and many more allowing for people to have a space to enjoy literature that is aimed at them and is so often forgotten by the main stream. I am hugely grateful for the chance to perform in such a lovely and welcoming space. Telling stories surrounded by the coolest books is a genuine privilege.

What do you think the audience will take away from hearing the stories?
Niall: I just hope they leave feeling like the stories were accessible and heartwarming. They are not especially clever or sophisticated, so the real aim is to just make people feel something. In a dream world they will leave feeling like they once did when their family members told them stories when they were children. In an even dreamier world they will retell the stories and make them their own.

What will you be doing after the Fringe?
Niall: To publish the stories would be a wee dream come true, but immediately after the Fringe I am moving down to London to start a Masters in Public Histories where I can indulge my far more nerdy side and hopefully continue performing as much and as often as possible.


BEDTIME STORIES

Aug 4, 15, 16, 18, 22, 23, 24, 25

Edinburgh’s Radical Bookshop (20.00)

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